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BLACK-OWNED TECH FIRM RELEASES WIRELESS EARBUDS

BLACK-OWNED TECH FIRM RELEASES WIRELESS EARBUDS

*Miami, FL  — Imagine being able to speak to anyone, anywhere at any time without any regard for language barriers or interruptions! Now imagine all of that technology fitting comfortably, but securely within your ear! For just $49.99 the F-Buds have smashed the wireless competition and created a new standard.Offering 50 hours of talk time on a single charge and up to 100ft of crystal clear sound with Google voice commands, the F-Buds are a must-have! The F-Buds can be purchased separately or with the new F-3 by going to Figgers.com/F-buds or by calling 1-800-223-5435. The F-Buds will also pair with any Bluetooth smart device on the market.Figgers Communications neglected not
NEXTPLAY EVENTS IS CHANGING THE WAY BLACK TECH PROFESSIONALS ENGAGE WITH RECRUITERS

NEXTPLAY EVENTS IS CHANGING THE WAY BLACK TECH PROFESSIONALS ENGAGE WITH RECRUITERS

If you’re black in tech, you’ve probably read time and time again how difficult it can be to find and connect with people who you can identify with. That is what prompted Lesley Toche to launch Nextplay Events to counter the narrative that black and brown talent is hard to find. The Oakland-based company was created to build community, create unprecedented access to career opportunities, and promote black and Latino culture in tech with the company’s motto being, #TheySayWeDontExist.As the founder and CEO of the company, Toche works closely with a team of tech vets who have graced some of the world’s largest tech enterprises. Prior to launching Nextplay, Toche worked at Linked
Underserved Entrepreneurs Find Support from Local Governments

Underserved Entrepreneurs Find Support from Local Governments

When it comes to attracting seed capital to start a business, entrepreneurs like 28-year-old De’Sha Bridges, founder of De’Shade Designer Eyewear, are at a clear disadvantage. Now living in Long Beach, California, she’s a young black businesswoman originally from Chicago. And while the number of startups founded by black women — about 270 in 2017 — has doubled since 2016, and their tiny share of venture funding is increasing, a majority of black women-led startups still aren’t able to raise any money.“It’s tough to be taken seriously,” said Bridges. “When I go to business events, people often ask me if I’m in the right place. It’s clear that when they look at me, they don’t always see a pers

Black Tech Company Creates App To Combat Police Brutality

Even with cameras at the ready on our phones, reporting police brutality can still be very tricky. However, thanks to a black-owned tech company, they are hoping to make the lines a little less blurred when it comes to exposing officers for misconduct. Through the RightThere Corp., Protech, an app to combat police brutality, was launched in 2018. The tech company was established by Maria Watkins, a Birmingham, Alabama, native. The entrepreneur developed the project in 2017 and soon the app will be available to both Android and Apple devices. The app includes GPS tracking, voice and touch activation, which can be used to alert emergency contacts. The app also has your back when it c
Beyond VC: The systemic issues that disadvantage Black and Brown founders

Beyond VC: The systemic issues that disadvantage Black and Brown founders

In February, Crunchbase published a damning look at venture capital and its pattern of overlooking founders of color. It’s “not a pipeline problem,” the site declared. The problem, it noted, is that VCs aren’t looking for underrepresented founders to forge deals with. And that appears to be true: When, according to RateMyInvestor’s Diversity Report, only 1% of venture-backed founders are Black and 1.8% are Latino, something is going on.VC consultant and startup founder Pedro Moore has seen a lot of Black and Brown founders lose out on VC funding. But, while the intuitive thing is to blame individuals — i.e. overtly racist VCs — the real issue is more c
Courtroom5, a case management platform, wins Black Founders Exchange Demo Day

Courtroom5, a case management platform, wins Black Founders Exchange Demo Day

DURHAM – Former professors Sonja Ebron and Debra Slone know first-hand how tricky it can be to get caught up in the United State’s legal system.“We’ve had to represent ourselves in court, unfortunately, too many times,” said Ebron. “As academics, we felt a responsibility once we understood the lay of the land to share it with others.”So they built Courtroom5 — an education site launched in 2017, which eventually grew into full-fledged case management platform.On Friday, the startup — which has already raised $100,000 in capital — won the Black Founders Exchange Demo Day competition. They’re now headed on an all-expense-paid trip to the San Francisco Bay area to meet with strat
Inspired by Black Wall Street, Triangle investors target black-led startups with new fund

Inspired by Black Wall Street, Triangle investors target black-led startups with new fund

DURHAM – Durham’s Black Wall Street may be long gone, but a team of local angel investors is working on a comeback of sorts.Enter Resilient Ventures, a new fund “inspired by the legacy of Black Wall Street” that specifically targets African American-led startups.Keith Daniel, owner of Durham-based Madison Consulting Group, and Thomas Droege, president of Droege Computing Services, started the fund.Their mission: close the existing wealth gap by expanding access to capital, networks and opportunity.“As far as we can tell, we’re the only fund, at least in the Durham-RTP area, that is explicitly targeting African-American founders,” Daniel told WRAL TechWire.Back in the early 1900s, b
VCs say they want to fund more black entrepreneurs – so why aren’t they?

VCs say they want to fund more black entrepreneurs – so why aren’t they?

RALEIGH – David Gardner, one of the Triangle’s most visible venture capitalists, says he’d like to invest in more African-American entrepreneurs.“We invest in what we see,” the managing partner of Cofounders Capital says. “They’ve got to come to us and ask for money.”If only it was that simple.Talk to most African-American entrepreneurs, and you’ll hear a common refrain: it’s tough to raise capital as a person of color.“There’s an added level of skepticism when a young, black entrepreneur walks into a room full of older, white male investors,” black founder Jalen Hatton recently told WRAL TechWire. “That can be kind of frustrating.”So why the disconnect?This week, it is among
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